HISTORY OF THE WEDDING CAKE
Fresco Foods Ltd - Any occasion is an occasion for a cake.
RSS

Recent Posts

Cake pops for children and for Adults
Birthday Cakes for Kids on Limited Diets Due to Allergies
EDIBLE IMAGES FOR THE HOME DECORATOR - BUY ONLINE
21st BIRTHDAY CAKES IN AUCKLAND
HENNA SWIRL DESIGN FOR A PREMIUM WEDDING CAKE

Categories

21st BIRTHDAY CAKES
BIRTHDAY CAKES AUCKLAND NEW ZEALAND
CAKE POPS AUCKLAND NZ
CHILDREN'S BIRTHDAY CAKES AUCKLAND, NEW ZEALAND
CHOCOLATE SCULPTURE CAKES
CHOCOLATE SPOONS
Corporate logo cakes/ Golden Jubilee cakes
CUPCAKES AUCKLAND NEW ZEALAND
DISNEY THEMED BIRTHDAY CAKES NZ
EDIBLE ICING IMAGES
GENDER REVEAL BABY SHOWER CAKE AUCKLAND, NZ
GLUTEN FREE, DAIRY FREE, EGG FREE CAKES AUCKLAND
Good As Gold Rich Fruit cake Product Range
MICKEY MOUSE BIRTHDAY CAKES AUCKLAND NEW ZEALAND
MOTHER'S DAY CAKES AUCKLAND DELIVERY OR NATIONWIDE DELIVERY
Occasion cakes for Special People
ORDER CAKES ONLINE NEW ZEALAND
PHOTO CAKES AND EDIBLE IMAGE CAKES
PROFESSIONAL GOURMET FINGER FOOD CATERING AUCKLAND NZ
SPECIAL REQUIREMENT CAKES - EGG FREE & GLUTEN FREE CAKES
SRI LANKAN COOKING CLASSES AUCKLAND NEW ZEALAND
Using Social media to connect with Customers & fans
Valentine's Day -Special Occasion
Wedding Cakes Auckland
WEDDING CAKES NZ
WEDDING FAVOURS
WHOLESALE CAKES FOR CAFE AND HOSPITALITY SERVICE AUCKLAND ,NZ
powered by

My Blog

HISTORY OF THE WEDDING CAKE

The contemporary wedding cake has grown out of many traditions. One of the first traditions began in Ancient Rome where bread was broken over the bride’s head to bring good fortune to the couple. In Medieval England cakes were stacked as high as possible for the bride and groom to kiss over, if they successfully kissed over the stack they were guaranteed a prosperous life together. From this the Croquembouche was created. The myth behind this cake tells that a Pastry Chef, visiting Medieval England, witnessed their tradition of piling sweet rolls between the bride and groom which they would attempt to kiss over without knocking them all down. The pastry chef then went back to France and piled sweet rolls up into a tower to make the first Croquembouche. The modern croquembouche is still very popular in France however it is common to place the croquembouche tower on a bed of cake and make it one of the top tiers of the wedding cake. This traditional French wedding cake is built from profiteroles and given a halo of spun sugar.
Traditionally the bride would place a ring inside the couples portion of the cake to symbolise the acceptance of the proposal. During the mid-17th century to the beginning of the 19th century, the “bride's pie” was served at most weddings. Guests were expected to have a piece out of politeness, it was considered very rude and bad luck not to eat the bride’s pie. One of the traditions of bride’s pie was to place a glass ring in the middle of the dessert and the maiden who found it would be the next to marry, similar to the modern tradition of catching the Flower bouquet. Bride’s pie eventually developed into the bride’s cake. At this point the dessert was no longer in the form of a pie and was sweeter than its predecessor. The bride cake was traditionally a plum or fruit cake, the myth that eating the pie would bring good luck was still common but the glass ring slowly died out and the catching of the flower bouquet took that meaning. The action of throwing the bouquet has its roots in the Ancient Greek myth of the Apple of Discord. Fruit cakes were a sign of fertility and prosperity which helped them gain popularity because all married men wanted to have plenty of children. The bride’s cake eventually transformed into the modern wedding cake that we know today. In the 17th century, two cakes were made, one for the bride and one for the groom. The groom's cake eventually died out and the brides cake turned into the main cake for the event. When the two cake were served together, the groom's cake was typically the darker colored, rich fruit cake and generally much smaller than the bride's cake. The bride’s cake was usually a simple pound cake with white icing because white was a sign of virginity and purity. In the early 19th century, when the bride’s cake’s were becoming more popular, sugar was coincidentally becoming easier to obtain. The more refined and whiter sugars were still very expensive therefore only the wealthy families could afford to have a very pure white frosting, this showed the wealth and the social status of the family. When Queen Victoria used white icing on her cake it gained a new title,  royal icing.
Tiered cake with calla lilies. White calla lilies are often used for weddings as a symbol of purity--this cake may have been requested by a mature couple who have been previously married.
The modern wedding cake as we know it now originated at the wedding of Prince Leopold, Duke of Albany, in 1882; his wedding cake was the first to actually be completely edible. Pillars between the cake tiers did not begin to appear until about 20 years later. The pillars were very poorly made from broomsticks covered in icing. The tiers represented prosperity and were a status symbol because only wealthy families could afford to include them in the cake.  Prince Leopold's wedding cake was created in separate layers with very dense icing. When the icing hardened the tiers were then stacked; this method had never been used before, and it was a groundbreaking innovation for wedding cakes at the time. Modern wedding cakes still use this method, but because of the size of today’s cakes, internal support is added to each layer in the form of dowels.
Source Info: Wikipedia

0 Comments to HISTORY OF THE WEDDING CAKE:

Comments RSS

Add a Comment

Your Name:
Email Address: (Required)
Website:
Comment:
Make your text bigger, bold, italic and more with HTML tags. We'll show you how.
Post Comment
Website Builder provided by  Vistaprint